Laura boushnak i read i write app

Be yourself, for the revolution is you. Do you want to be updated on the articles that we post here. Only after explaining to them how their stories might influence other women's lives, how they would become role models for their own community, did some agree. And here I would like to end with a quote by Yasmine, one of the four activist women I interviewed in Tunisia.

To instigate change in people and things that have created boundaries of thought. More than that, we hope that you can find the message hidden in every one of her masterpieces. So I will study to become a beautician and open a salon with my sister.

Laura Boushnak

She is now After bearing three children, she divorced again at the age of At 14, she became the third wife of a year-old man, and by the time she was 18, she was a divorced mother of three.

I revolt, and the revolution is female. If she criticized him, she was chastised by her elders who cautioned her of the consequence of such actions. Egypt- Illiteracy series" was acquired by the British Museum in[11] and by private collectors.

Through this, she made mainstream the poor conditions in war zones that are often overlooked by people who are not affected of it. Umm El-Saad, Asma and Fayza, and many women across the Arab world, show that it is possible to overcome barriers to education, which they know is the best means to a better future.

I saw how she was longing to gain control over her simple daily routines, small details that we take for granted, from counting money at the market to helping her kids in homework. Despite her poverty and her community's mindset, which belittles women's education, Umm El-Saad, along with her Egyptian classmates, was eager to learn how to read and write.

Yasmine wrote, "Question your convictions. When Yasmine was still at school, she took part in events which applauded the now-deposed president Ben Ali.

She received a grant from a local NGO to fund her business studies at the university. The passion I developed for knowledge, which allowed me to break barriers towards a better life was the motivation for my project I Read I Write. I revolt, and the revolution is female.

Her wonders do not just stop there because she is also known as a very talented photographer and artists. Along with the nine-month illiteracy eradication program, the women are also provided with classes that would teach them social empowerment skills. The secular bioengineering student is quite active on social media.

But for an overwhelming number of women in the Arab world, basic literacy is not a given. Boushnak was born in a Middle East country — Kuwait to be exact.

She was attending a nine-month literacy program run by a local NGO in the Cairo suburbs. Her experiences in life are said to be what added life to here works. She is now She was attending a nine-month literacy program run by a local NGO in the Cairo suburbs.

Laura Boushnak is a Kuwaiti-born Palestinian photographer. Ahlam Al-Jasim, principal of one of the six Future School Project, said that as part of the educational reforms taking place in Kuwait, there should be a focus on the integration of education and culture; that education is not just about dispensing knowledge, but the method by which it is passed.

Now I feel much better. Her work ranges from conflict photography to pictorial storytelling.

Gallery: When reading is an act of daring

See select photos below. Months later, she was joking that her husband had threatened to pull her out of the classes, as he found out that his now literate wife was going through his phone text messages.

I write and send my words out from place to place. Her photographs have been published by many international newspapers and magazines, such as: The secular bioengineering student is quite active on social media.

Two out of three women in Yemen are illiterate. But honestly, there is nothing simple about this woman.

For Yemeni and other Arab women, the only way to overcome this proverb is by pursuing higher education. Laura Boushnak (لورا بشناق; born ) is a Kuwaiti-born Palestinian photographer and artist whose work is focused on women, literacy, and education reform in the Arab tsfutbol.com her ongoing documentary project "I Read I Write" she photographed girls and women changing their lives with education in Egypt, Yemen, Kuwait, Jordan and Tunisia.

Watch video · Despite her poverty and her community's mindset, which belittles women's education, Umm El-Saad, along with her Egyptian classmates, was eager to learn how to read and write.

In Tunisia, I met Asma, one of the four activist women I interviewed. Laura Boushnak receives a special grant, in celebration of Getty Images’ partnership with Lean In, for her work titled I Read I Write, which explores the education of women in the Middle East.

Collectively, Arab countries have the highest rate of female illiteracy in the world, which this project aims to address by focusing on highly-educated.

Most of us take for granted that we can read, say, the street signs outside of our house. But for an overwhelming number of women in the Arab world, basic literacy is not a given. That’s why inphotographer and TED Fellow Laura Boushnak (TED Talk: For these women, reading is a daring act) began “I Read, I Write,” a series that.

Laura Boushnak

was the motivation for my project I Read I Write. Pushed by my own experience, 【TED】Laura Boushnak: For these women, reading is a daring act (Laura Boushnak: For these women, reading is a daring act) Folder Collection.

Download App; Listening Quiz; Tour. Laura Boushnak is a Kuwaiti-born Palestinian photographer whose work focuses on women, literacy and education reform in the Arab world. Why you should listen Boushnak's documentary project I Read I Write explores the barriers women face accessing education and the role of literacy in improving the lives of women in Egypt, Yemen, Kuwait, Jordan.

Laura boushnak i read i write app
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